Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Importance of creativity for Children


Each individual is born with immense potential for creativity. People who are extremely successful in the fields of medicine, arts, entrepreneurship, politics, pure sciences, engineering, education or public service have benefited from a mentor and/or an environment that nurtured creative thought and action. Starting Early “A baby's brain seems to be the most powerful learning computer on the planet.” says psychologist Alison Gopnik in her TED talk. The duration of a species’ childhood correlates to the size of its brain and intelligence. Humans have a comparatively longer childhood than other species. Children have the ability to come up with unconventional solutions to problems. Billions of associations are being made within their brain based on all the stimuli and experiences that they encounter; this process slows down as we age. Early childhood is therefore, a great window of opportunity to develop the child’s abilities. How to encourage creativity in children Introduce younger children to good raw materials like paints, markers, coloured papers, clay and blocks. Encourage them to try their hands at art, music, dance or simple science experiments. Great innovations begin as an imaginative thought! Older children can be introduced to challenging and interesting problems relating to the environment, health, sciences or society. It is ok to be messy when it comes to creativity. Although it might be challenging, allowing for mistakes and experimentation lets children put all their ideas to work. Care must be taken to ensure health & safety. Be aware about the culture of overconsumption. Filling up the mind passively by watching TV shows, playing video games and using certain gadgets for very long periods of time may actually hurt creativity. Appreciate any creative solutions that children come up with even if they aren’t perfect. Do not try to control the outcome of what a child is trying to achieve. Giving importance to the process of creation rather than the end result sets the perfect tone for coming up with great solutions. Excessive focus on achieving high grades by curtailing free flowing creative time can hurt creativity and therefore career prospects! On the other hand, overtly forcing creativity might actually prevent creative outcomes. We can set an example for children and others around us by being creative ourselves. Conclusion Creativity is not about just amusement. Helping children take small steps towards becoming more creative everyday has many benefits. We are not just helping children solve everyday problems, but we are building resilience, independent thought, and preparing them for dealing with unfamiliar situations. So how are you going to inspire a child today?

Sunday, March 8, 2015

Is your child stressed out because of his school or you?


Let's take a look at our children today. We parents strongly believe that we are giving them the best of everything and training them to be the best version of themselves, but, let's think again. Are we?? Really??

Gone are the days when coming home after school meant going out and playing until we were forced to come in because it was late. School meant meeting friends and planning the next evening of fun. It was hoping that the teacher is absent, it was looking forward to free periods and turning in our home work at the nth moment.

Our parents advised and lectured us, but little did we listen. Well, some did and it anyway paid off for all in the long run. We were never pressurized into doing activities or nailed under the expectations of fueling someone else's dream. Unfortunately, how many children can agree to this today? They are sent to innumerable activities after school, and enrolled in classes they do not wish to attend. Every parent now wants their child to excel in every field. Every parent wants their child to do what they were unable to. Every parent is hoping to fulfil their

dreams through their child. Is that fair? We adults cannot manage to work a nine-hour shift, then get home and do the household chores, cater to everyone's needs and go to bed at night without complaining. Yet, our children spend the whole day at school, which by no means is easy with the extensive competition, extra and co-curricular activities, additional assessments, and peer pressure, and come home before going for tuitions, extra classes and co-ordinated activities after which they have a lot of homework to finish before retiring to bed. And somehow, we still assume that they have a carefree and less stressful life.

We often take the liberty to say that children are doing a lot in school and, yes, they are. All schools cater to a child's holistic development. They nurture the child and help develop all possible skills exposing him to innumerable activities and opportunities to learn. Why, then, do parents insist on their child having the edge over other children??

Yes, children are made to put in their best efforts and invest their time in school, where they are challenged to work to their best ability, and therefore need to relax once they get home.

So, keeping in mind the child's needs, abilities and interests, both parents and teachers must cater to what's best for a child to grow while being nurtured and less stressed.

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Safety at Trio World School


Adhering to the highest standards that any international school must mandatory impart, TRIO makes utterly sure that the school becomes a haven for its pupils. The security here is impeccably the best with over 60 CCTV digital cameras installed at various places insides the school. We even have CCTV and GPRS in our buses by which our pupils commute. These buses have seat belts, fire extinguishers for 100% safety commuting. Speed Governors and First aids boxes are an appendage.

Before making any kind of recruitment, TRIO ensures that every teaching and non-teaching candidate goes through Criminal Background Verification Check.

The school premises is built upon keeping in mind that no safety measure remains untouched and the students spend their time unscathed. For ensuring this, all classroom doors have disabled locks from the inside; one can clearly see through glass of each classroom doors for visibility and the unused rooms are locked permanently. Every classroom has a smoke detector and a fire alarm installed. We make it a point that students get their learning within carefree and safe class rooms.

All staff and support staff are on company role they are to follow company disciplinary policies. They have to mandatorily adhere to the written or implied regulations that school enlists for them.

TRIO implements child protection policy and complaint redressed provisions. This gives a guarantee that every child is within full safety ambit. Students are not allowed to access to mobile phones during their school hours. Moreover, Internet and Wi-Fi are firewalled so that there remains no media and personal mails access for misuse. This leaves no ground for negligence at any cost.

At every quarter, mock fire alarm drill is conducted in the school to make every one learn to take safety measure at the time of panic or danger. In case, if there is still any accident that takes place in the campus, we assure that the staff and the students get comprehensive accidental cover to the utmost extent.

Some accidental cases owe their transpiration to psychological ratiocinates. We therefore facilitate to have for our school, a psychological counselor for time-to-time counseling given at the time of need. TRIO owes to unmatched safety standards that any international institution is bound to have.

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Trio World School, Entrepreneurship and Children

Entrepreneurship and children.jpg
Trio World School, Bangalore, believes in grooming our students to be proactive and compassionate contributors to the society. An entrepreneurial mindset is one asset that students can be encouraged to cultivate. At Trio, we believe it is our responsibility as an international school to impart globally relevant skills that can transform communities.

What is Entrepreneurship?

One might feel that the term entrepreneurship is overused by the media. But in a broader sense, it is a way of approach to life that indentifies needs or problems and utilizes resources in the best possible way, to benefit all the people involved.

The benefits of starting early

The CEO of Zappos, online shoe and clothing store, Tony Hseih, ran a business of making custom buttons when he was 12 years old.
As we grow older, our imagination tends to be less broad & unrestrained. Children on the other hand, are energetic, creative and adventurous. They have immense potential to become problem solvers.

New technologies continue to make our lives simpler and more enjoyable. Some of these are the result of such bold ventures. Despite these, the society still faces problems that affect the health and livelihoods of its people.
What we can do to help students

Students must not just be taught the practical skills behind entrepreneurship. Values like discipline, hard work, compassion, honesty, courage and persistence can be inculcated in them. Skills like brainstorming, goal setting, planning and team work need to be boosted.

One needs to teach them that there are many ways to approach a problem. By teaching kids that making mistakes while learning is really the best way to grow, we are bolstering their ability to be innovative at solving problems. They must be encouraged to pick challenging problems and tackle them with enthusiasm.

Profits and monetary benefits are only one aspect of succeeding as an entrepreneur. Focusing solely on these gains might be a detriment to their personal growth and can thwart great ideas. When we contribute to the prosperity of a community, it cannot but take us to new heights.

Monday, June 23, 2014

First days in school – A parent’s ready reckoner

So your precious child has been admitted to nursery and as she or he takes the first steps towards independence, you as a parent must naturally seem very concerned and eager to ensure that it is a smooth transition for the child. Here are a few tips from an experienced nursery teacher. Ms. Naseem from Trio World School has more than ten years experience, and these tips will definitely help every anxious parent as their tiny tots navigate the journey from home to school.


  • While bringing your children into the school campus, always lead the child by hand by your side. This develops more independence and more confidence in the child. When you hold the child in your arms or communicate over possessiveness, the child will find the transition very difficult.

  • Calm down and trust the teacher and the institution. You would have enrolled your child in only after checking the credentials of the institution and believing in the institution’s capabilities.

  • It takes a minimum of 2 – 3 months for the child to fully settle in. Only after that period does learning set in. Therefore the instructions for early years are very different from that of higher classes. Trust that.

  • Don’t disrespect the teacher. Remember she is a human being and has under her care a minimum of at least 20 children. Respect her time and that the same way your child is important to her, the other children are equally important to her.

  • A teaching methodology designed for children is set up after due consideration and planning. It is not something that can be explained to you in 5 or 10 minutes. Trust the learning methodology at work and wait patiently for results in your child. Each child has his/her own learning curve.

  • At home reinforce the learnings in the classroom by talking about it and encouraging the child. This will greatly aid in the child’s learning curve.

  • Provide play dough, physical & outdoor activities which develop social skills & cognitive learning in the child. This prepares the child for school.

  • At home, encourage the child to eat on his/her own with a spoon. Even if it is messy don’t look for an easier option to feed. This will encourage good eating habits in the child and you don’t need to be overtly anxious if your child is eating in school.

  • Your child’s teacher and you are on the same page – always remember that.

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Typical Day at TRIO World School Bengaluru

At Trio World School we offer an individual education for each student.

The TWS curriculum combines extra-curricular interests and sports with a wide range of academic studies to develop a personal programme.

This personal combination of studies is overseen by Head of the School, that ensure that any of the inevitable clashes of interest are addressed and that extra time rehearsing for Hamlet doesn't mean Math's homework is no longer important!

We expect a lot from our students: each academic subject sets homework to be completed before the next lesson, so pupils soon learn the skills of time management and prioritising that will give them the self-confidence and independence required at university and beyond.

The week runs from Monday to Friday from 8am to 3.30pm with 6, 50-minute periods each day plus. All students have two scheduled afternoons of sports a week.

In High School, homework is set for every school day and should take about one and a half hours not including private study for their examination subjects. Students in the Middle School are expected to spend at least three hours a week on homework. Primary school students will be given a minimum of 20 minutes homework thrice weekly. Parents of Infant students are actively encouraged to help with colouring pictures, learning new words and writing letters and counting as often as possible.

Monday, June 16, 2014

Integrating Extra-curricular activities into the curriculum

In most schools extra-curricular activities run hand-in-hand with academics these days. What started out tentatively as one odd dance or music or theatre class conducted after school hours has now been integrated into the school time table in very many schools. However one thing has still not changed. By and large schools still consider such activities as ‘extra-curricular’ in nature. True they are extra-curricular, but our experience in Trio World School is that they accrue tremendous benefits to the emotional well-being and growth of the student which ultimately is what education is all about.


Any activity that fosters a sense of team spirit, mutual respect, emotional maturity, emotional strength, humility, right values, emotional growth and the ability to transcend and overcome challenges is after all the ultimate goal of education. These are the essential soft skills that students will take forward in their lives. This will be the basis of their persona – what they project to the outside world and the basis of their lives. Class room teaching no matter how advanced or how inclusive, cannot only be the basis of knowledge dispersal. Learning must happen through various sources in unexpected places – like the football ground, when the student least expects!


At Trio World School we have seen how theatre has helped very many children develop emotional stability and growth. Through specialised theatre games, a deeper sense of harmony, bonding, better confidence, improved communication skills, reduced stress levels and a better self-esteem in participants is visible. The theatre has achieved much because it evokes the child-like state in participants and addresses deep rooted issues through play. Very many institutions today have theatre as an extra-curricular activity but don’t probably realize that for many students it is a potential life-saver. For most, it is only a hobby that students can pursue, but for the avid participant it can be his universe.


To validate our point about how extra-curricular activities can go hand-in-hand with academics we looked outside our institution and spoke to Shonali Acharya who is passionate about the choir and a class XII student of a leading school in Bangalore. In her school, like in other schools, the choir for instance is an independent extra-curricular activity. What Shonali shared was an eye-opener, “Being a member of a choir is the highest form of social interaction. This is because every member must have effective communication In order to produce the perfect harmony. With respect to timing and tone production each and every person works together. Also, the frequent meetings to practice enable exchange of information, news about each other and one and other. This makes it a highly charged social atmosphere.”


When asked about how the experience has specifically been for her, she continues “I have been a part of my school choir since the 1st standard. Being part of the choir has been very rewarding. It helped me grow as a person and gave me confidence and made me feel very good about myself. Its inclusiveness is incomparable and when I was in the tenth standard the thought of losing that scared me. Not being part of the choir? Join another choir? Blasphemy! So I decided to continue in my school for my 11th & 12th and continue to be a part of the choir. That was the best decision ever!”


So what has she learnt from that experience? “I miss choir now that I am passing out of school, but it made me a better person. It taught me about hard work and responsibility and how that eventually pays off in the end. It taught me to maintain a balance between fun and seriousness. Being a part of the choir also proved that if you do what you love somehow it will work out for you and if you are passionate about your work it will show and people will recognize it.” She is misty-eyed as she signs off.


Finding a common deeper co-relation in the outcomes of two diverse forms like theatre and choir singing is particularly fascinating. What is even more fascinating is when the institution can bring them as an added aid in education and not leave them to their own devices. Can that be done? Of course it can and that is what we at Trio World School have been aiming at. To illustrate with an example we take you to our football field. Now P.E Education is just an extra-curricular activity everywhere else, but not at Trio.


Avinash Kumar the Head of our P.E department has a work experience of eleven years. Avinash believes that the corner stone of physical education is ‘skill, fitness and life skills’. Life-skills? Let him explain.


“Sports develop trust, honesty, the need to follow rules and regulations...It is a medium where we learn life skills along with sports skills. Students learn discipline. They learn how to cope with situations. It brings out the fighting spirit in students and they also learn to help each other. Take any sport, for instance football. Without any of these skills, one cannot be a good football player” he avers.


Avinash shares one specific example where Physical Education class go hand in hand with academics to make a difference to a student. He gives the example of a student who had severe behavioural issues. When this was noticed, the teacher tried to address the issue in the classroom. When it was found that different approaches had their limitations, she tried to understand the student’s areas of interest. It was found that the student had a keen interest in football. Keeping this in mind, the teacher consulted with Avinash about the best re-course to deal with this situation. Avinash’s approach was a two-pronged strategy. One was to counsel the student and to devise a sports based approach to help the child deal with situations. He found that the child was facing personal issues at home and was unable to cope with it leading to behavioural challenges in school. He then devised a sports-based strategy which focused on developing life-skills to cope with the child’s personal challenges.


Corrective approaches were built into the sports approach. If aggression was exhibited on the sports field, a time-out was given to enable the student to reflect on the behaviour. Thus with a guided approach in a span of three – five months the student was better able to deal with personal issues. Needless to say the student turned out to be a well-balanced and mature individual with no residue of the previous disturbing behaviour.


At Trio World School similarly Physical Education classes have been used to help deal with conditions like dyslexia, ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Syndrome) and Autism. In all these cases, sports have played a remarkable role in developing life skills in students.


In a fast paced world with numerous challenges, we need all the help we can to make education truly work. It is the need of the hour to use extra-curricular activities in schools not only as an add-on but to be able to be integrated well with education. When done so, it can complement educational, emotional, and psycho-social needs of children.